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Present Perfect

I have done
 
We can use the Present Perfect with unspecific expressions such as: ever, never, once, many times, several times, before, so far, already, yet, how long etc.
 
Positive
  • It's the most boring film I've ever seen.
  • I’ve never met his wife.
  • I haven't eaten anything since breakfast.
  • He’s been working all day.
  • He has never driven a truck before.
  • I’ve just been out to the supermarket.
  • She's gone to London for a week.
  • I've met a lot of people in the last few days.
  • We haven't had any problems so far.
  • He's already left.
  • There's been an accident.
  • They haven't seen each other for a long time.
  • Chris has not finished his homework yet.

Negative

  • I have not eaten breakfast today
  • She has not finished her homework yet
  • They haven't seen each other for a long time.
  • It has not snowed this winter
  • We have not had any salary for over a month.
  • He has not been with the company long enough to get holliday pay.  
  • They have not been moved into their new house yet.

Questioning

  • Have I missed the tram?
  • Have you visited Paris?
  • Have you heard anything from Peter recently?
  • Have they studied American history before?
  • Have you ever seen a ghost?
  • How long have they been married?
  • Has he worked as a mechanic before?
  • Where have you been up to now?
  • Has she met Simon?
  • Has it been warm this week?

Have / has + the past participle

Make the past participle by adding 'ed' to regular verbs (for example, 'work' becomes 'worked')
 
There are a few verbs that change their spelling when you add 'ed' (for example, 'study' becomes 'studied')
 
I have finished I've finished
 
You have worked You've worked
 
We have studied We've studied
 
 
While other stay the same
 
They have gone They've gone
 
He has done He's done
 
It has been It's been
 
 
We use the present perfect tense for something that started in the past and continues in the present, for something we have done several times in the past and continue to do.
 
  • They’ve been married for nearly  thirty years.
  • She has lived in Nottingham all her life.
 
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