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Past perfect

I had done
 
The past perfect simple is had+ past participle (gone/ seen/ finished…). is used in the same way as the present perfect, but it refers to a time in the past, not the present.
 
Positive
  • Peter had left the party before I arrived.
  • I had sent my email before the computer crashed.
  • When they arrived we had already put up their tent.
Negative
  • When I got home yesterday, my wife had not cooked me any dinner.
  • I wanted to go to work early, because I had not completed my project.
  • He was very tired because he hadn't slept well last weekend.
Questioning
  • Had you seen that type of car before?
  • Had Peter given you the keys to the house before the police arrived?
  • Had the body been moved after it was discovered?
Note, we don't use the past perfect a lot in English, but it is helpful.
 
Past perfect + just
 
Just is used with the past perfect to refer to an event that was only a short time earlier than before now.
  • The shop had just run out of soap when I arrived.
  • He had just left the room when my husband arrived.
  • I had just finished washing my car when it started to rain.
We often use a clause with since to show when something started in the past:
  • They had been our neighbors since we moved here.
  • I was upset when the office closed, I had worked there since I left school.
We often use the past perfect tense in reported speech after verbs like said, told, asked, thought, and wondered.
  • She told me that the ship had left.
  • I thought I had eaten here before, but I was wrong.
  • He explained that he had taken my washing inside because of the rain.
  • I wondered if I had seen him before.
  • I asked them why it had taken so long.
When we are reporting our experience and including up to the (then) present.
  • My wedding was the worst day I had ever had.
  • I was happy to meet Mary, I hadn’t met her before, even though I had met her children several times.
For something that happened in the past but is important at the time of reporting.
  • I couldn’t lock the car, I had lost my car keys.
  • Peter wasn’t at school, he had gone swimming.
We use the past perfect to talk about the past in conditions, suggestions and wishes:
  • I would have gone shopping for him if he had asked.
  • That was very dangerous, what if you had fallen off the ladder?
  • I wish I hadn’t drunk so much beer last night.
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