Follow us @chooseenglish Connect with your favourite social network.
Best viewed using the Google Chrome browser

Some and Any

  • There are some cars.
  • There are some ships.
  • Can I have some oranges?
  • Can I have some beans?
  • Would you like some french fries?
  • Would you like some pineapples?

With an s at the end, they are examples of countable nouns.

Countable nouns are nouns which are separate objects. We can count them.

And a countable noun can exist in the singular and also the plural.

So we use the word some in positive sentences for countable nouns which are in the plural.

We only use the word some if the countable noun is in the plural.

  • There is some rice.
  • There is some beer.
  • Can I have some juice?
  • Can I have some fish?
  • Do you want some sauce?
  • Would you like some tea?

They are uncountable nouns so that is always in the singular, this is slightly different, as uncountable nouns are not separate objects.

We cannot count uncountable nouns, they can only exist in the singular. So the verb is in the singular and the noun is in the singular.

And so we also use the word some for uncountable nouns in positive sentences.

Some

Rule one

We use  some in positive sentences with countable nouns and uncountable nouns.

Rule two

We use some in questions asking for something: countable nouns in the plural and uncountable nouns.

Rule three

We use some in questions offering something: countable nouns in the plural and uncountable nouns.

Any
  • Do you have any cherries?
  • Are there any boats?
  • I do not want any onions.
  • There aren’t any blackberries.
  • Is there any bread in the freezer?
  • Do you have any cheese?
  • We don’t want any beer.
  • There isn’t any rice.
     

Rule one

We use any in questions: countable nouns in the plural and uncountable nouns.

Rule two

We use any in the negative :countable nouns in the plural and uncountable nouns.

 

Leave a Comment